You are creative and imaginative, but nonetheless selecting a name for your business You are excited but still need to be sure not to be so imaginative so as create confusion.

It’s tempting use your own name as it gives your business that personal touch, after all it worked for Calvin Klein and Alexander McQueen. Context is key, Calvin Klein started his business in 1968 whilst Alexander McQueen made a name for himself being appointed head designer for Givenchy. Starting a business in this modern age, you are operating in a different world to Calvin Klein and unless you were a senior person for a significant figure in your field you aren’t riding off the sort of success Alexander McQueen had. Personal branding take kudos and wholehearted commitment to you being the product.

All that said, using your own name may still be appropriate if you are providing a service that only you can perform. It also works really well if you are an author, fine artist or musician, after all, the common denominator in all your work is… you. Remember, though, your name will need to both something memorable and different. However if you decide that you want to christen your business with a snazzy name use the following guiding principles to come up with a creative name that works.

 

Consideration #1: Business Vision and Values

 

The name that you choose for your business should be a reflection of your vision and values.  Think about the words that you’d like your business to be described as and the emotions you would like to create for you, customers.

What is important to you when you are working, professionalism, playfulness, quality materials, service and delivery; this needs to align to the name you’ve have chosen. This will build consistency in the brand promise you are creating

 

Consideration #2: Can People Get It Right

 

Now, when you get started you may find that the creative juices take over. But, if each time you tell someone your company name you have to spell it; “no, that’s Jets with a ‘z’ “. The likelihood is that for those who hear about you by word of mouth will never be able to find your website because they can’t spell it.

As much fun as it may be to come up with creative spelling, you will probably find it to be counterproductive in the long term. Also, think about how easy it is to say. Make it easy for others to spread the word for you. The last thing your want people saying is it’s a really cool company, but I’ll be damned if I can say the name. Your name should be easy to remember, in this respect I must say ‘Apple’ are brilliant.

 

Consideration #3: Attracts Your Ideal Client

 

You name should be something that intrigues your ideal customer. Could you see it being a name that your ideal customer would happily use in conversation? Think about the sorts of images your business name is likely to create in the mind of your potential customer. Will it be clear to them what you do and for whom?

 

Consideration #4: Availability

 

Now to the reality check bit. The name you choose needs to be available. This means that you could register it at companies house, use the web domain and use it for social media (less important – knowem.com is great for checking social media profiles across multiple platforms).

First things first it’s worth doing a Google search on the name that you are thinking of choosing and seeing what else comes up. If the Google search doesn’t bring back anything to worry about then there are two more important checks. Firstly check that you can purchase the domain name is available. I can recommend GoDaddy for doing this, it’ll take seconds. If it is not available avoid the temptation to misspell the name to get the domain. Remember, it’s got to be memorable.

Secondly, if you are planning to set up a limited company structure, then you’ll need to check that the company name is available. You can use the government website to do this in seconds. My advice, once you have found one that is available, register it as quickly as possible. It can be highly frustrating to come back later to purchase a domain and discover that it is no longer free.